Malcolm Lee out with “chrondal” knee injury; Alexey Shved in

Steve McPherson —  December 14, 2012 — 4 Comments

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Today the Wolves confirmed reports aout Malcolm Lee and his injured right knee.

The Minnesota Timberwolves today announced that guard Malcolm Lee has suffered a chrondal injury in his right knee and will be out indefinitely. Lee and the organization are in the process of further evaluating the injury to determine the next steps for treatment. Once a determination is made, an update to his status will be provided. The injury occurred in the second quarter of Minnesota’s 108-105 win vs. Denver on Wednesday night.

Lee, a second-year guard from UCLA, is averaging 4.9 points and 2.4 rebounds in 18.1 minutes per game this season. He has started 12 of the last 13 games for Minnesota and has appeared in 16 games overall. Lee scored a career-high 10 points at Philadelphia on Dec. 4.

For those of us who aren’t med students, a chrondal injury is one to the articular cartilage of the knee. Not helpful? Basically, without knowing the severity of the injury, it’s hard to know what this means for Lee’s prospects. According to this website (which has a picture of snowboarding, so you know they know what’s up), treatment could be non-surgical or go all the way up to debridement (which is what Roy had done on his arthritic knee) or microfracture surgery. Time will tell. For what it’s worth, chrondal injuries are degenerative, which doesn’t sound very good.

What this does, however, is clear the way for Alexey Shved to start at shooting guard. According to Jerry Zgoda over at the Star Tribune, Shved wore the white starter’s jersey in practice today. Coincidentally, that’s same color as the whole starting lineup now.

 

Steve McPherson

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4 responses to Malcolm Lee out with “chrondal” knee injury; Alexey Shved in

  1. I didn’t know they were degenerative.

    All articulating surfaces (the parts of two bones that meet to form a joint) have a layer of cartilage upon them (chondr- means cartilage). The cartilage helps absorb impact and protect the bone. The cartilage itself is nourished by the synovial fluid that surrounds it (contained by the synovial capsule that surrounds most joints). Counter intuitively, gentle impacts on the cartilage (say from walking or light jogging) work to ‘pump’ new fluid into the cartilage and old fluid out. This is how oxygen and nutrients get the cartilage cells.

    I think it’s interesting that this is an articular cartilage injury and not meniscal. I would imagine that it would be less severe, but I don’t really know. If Lee is up and moving about in the next few days I think we’ll have our answer.

  2. I’m pretty sure the word should be “chondral”, right?

  3. NBA GM Craigslist posting:

    WTT for one or more NBA caliber guards. Without degenerative knee/leg issues preferred – but really whatever at this point.

    Willing to pay by cash or former #2 pick in the draft – willing to meet in a public place near downtown Minneapolis. I work in the area and can meet pretty much anywhere near First Ave.

    Email d.kahn@timberwolves.com – this is not a spam post – it’s 34 degrees in Minneapolis today.

    Hit me up yo.

  4. Brian, I hear what you’re saying. I can’t quite remember exactly what the root is, but I think it’s ‘chondr’ as chondral, or chondroplasty. You tack on whatever modifying ending or conjoining ‘o’ you need.

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