Brewer

Reports surfaced about a week ago that the Houston Rockets were determined to use their $8.4 million trade exception by December 19th. When they struck out on Rajon Rondo, they turned their attention elsewhere, which apparently meant Corey Brewer.

Adrian Wojnarowski was the first to confirm what Darren Wolfson of 1500 ESPN and Jonathon Feigen of the Houston Chronicle have been discussing for days: the Minnesota Timberwolves have sent Corey Brewer, Ronny Turiaf (who is injured, and likely only being included for salary purposes) to Houston in exchange for shooting guard Troy Daniels and a pair of second round picks. Continue Reading…

Corey Brewer, Jeff Green

In preparation for tonight’s game in Boston, I had a chat with SB Nation’s Celtics Blog writer Dustin Chapman, a guy I’ve talked basketball with for a long, long time. Click here to follow him on Twitter. We talked about the Rondo trade, key matchups, and discussed Pek vs Vitor in a battle of the giants.

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ThadYoung

I didn’t go to my first funeral until I was in my mid-20s. This is not to say that I didn’t lose people in my family: both my grandmothers died within a couple years of each other and my dad’s brother died while I was in college. But for myriad reasons — timing, travel and, truly, fear of death as a real thing — kept me from attending their funerals. I think my understanding of funerals at the time could best be described as “death is unequivocally bad and scary and funerals must therefore be the same.” I didn’t understand them as part of the long, uneven grieving process.

Timberwolves power forward Thaddeus Young lost his mother this year, at the age of 26. I lost mine at the age of 30. Britt Robson’s column this week for MinnPost is an excellent and thorough look at Young’s struggles this season on the court with due deference given to the way his mother’s death has bifurcated his season into a before and after, but I wanted to talk a little about how a human loss seeps into every aspect of our lives for longer than we usually anticipate. Continue Reading…

JohnWallIsTheOneWhoKnocks

This game wasn’t as close as the score would imply. However, it was pretty close at various times throughout the night, which makes it a bit confusing as a whole. About six or so minutes into the game, it seemed like I was going to have to find a blowout recap topic for tonight’s game and I even crowd-sourced for a few ideas. John Wall was picking apart the Wolves and we had several instances of big men not getting back on defense.

There were multiple plays in the first couple of minutes in which Thaddeus Young and Gorgui Dieng were slow to either get back in transition, only to get beaten down the floor by Marcin Gortat and Kris Humphries, or to locate their defensive assignment once they did get back. You don’t give space to John Wall’s passing targets and win to talk about it. He’s too good at this stage in his career and as the Wolves found out a few times, you can’t just play 10 feet off of him and expect him to Kemba Walker that jump shot. His game doesn’t break like that anymore.

Since this was a blowout that wasn’t a blowout, let’s actually recap instead of me just rambling for 1,400 words about Pauly D from Jersey Shore or something along those lines.  Continue Reading…

Last night, Ronny Turiaf posted the above photo and (apparently original) poem on Instagram, this morning, he had successful surgery on his right hip, and this afternoon, the Timberwolves announced the 10th-year pro out of Gonzaga will miss the remainder of the 2014-15 NBA season.

Drafted in the second round (37th overall pick) of the 2005 Draft, Turiaf spent time with the Lakers, Warriors, Knicks, Wizards, Heat and Clippers before signing a 2 year, $2 million free agent deal with the Timberwolves prior to 2013-14. He missed a large chunk of last year following a freak elbow injury that occurred against the Thunder on November 1st; in 33 total appearances with Minnesota, Ronny averaged 4.5 points, 5.3 rebounds and 1.5 blocks in 18.5 minutes per game.  Continue Reading…

KobeToWiggins

While Kobe Bryant can elicit some pretty polarized takes on how great he is or isn’t, how nice he is or isn’t, how good of a leader/teammate that he is or isn’t, and everything else involved with historic players, what you can’t deny is his psychotic, competitive nature that has fueled one of the greatest careers you could ever imagine. To be completely honest with everybody, I was beyond jealous that I wasn’t in the Target Center Sunday night when Kobe passed Michael Jordan for third on the all-time scoring list. Sure, it’s come in what will essentially be a lost/wasted season for Bryant and his Los Angeles Lakers, but history is history, and the Target Center saw something no other building will ever see — Kobe passing Jordan on the all-time scoring list.

The game was another injury-riddled loss by the Wolves, desperate for the direction of a point guard with a little bit of a veteran touch at his disposal. But there were aspects to this game that were fascinating. Mostly, they resided around the burning desire of Kobe to kill the defender in front of him, despite the Hall of Famer being at the end of his rope athletically (relatively speaking, of course). 36-year old Kobe Bryant plays a megalomaniacal brand of basketball. It’s both an inspiration to those that have come after him and a cautionary tale of finding the right balance between hubris and a pathos of sorts. That’s not a knock on Bryant either. If anything, it’s a compliment about a player that by all historical measurements shouldn’t be able to do what he does anymore.

Kobe is the league’s third leading scorer after 1,269 games, 18-plus years, and over 46,000 minutes in the NBA. That just doesn’t happen. The retort is about how he’s shooting under 40.0% from the field while hoisting all of these shots that allow him to be the scoring leader. And it’s completely correct. He’s allowed to play a certain way that almost no other player has ever been afforded at this point in their careers. To me, that’s why it’s so impressive and it’s a blueprint for competitiveness that I pray someone on the Wolves picks up. I’ll explain:  Continue Reading…

shabazz-muhammad-timberwolves-hazing

Fully healthy, the Timberwolves would still not be as good as the Oklahoma City Thunder. The Thunder have Russell Westbrook back, and he went for 34 points, 6 assists, 6 rebounds and could essentially get to the rim whenever he wanted by turning on the jets. The Thunder have eight players 6-10 or taller (if you count Durant, who is at least 6-10); the Wolves have one healthy player over 6-10 (Gorgui Dieng). No surprise, then, that Oklahoma City outrebounded Minnesota 47-30. The expected disparities were there: the Wolves took 7 3-pointers and made just one; the Thunder made 6 and took 23. If the Portland game the other night had everything going against the Blazers and for the Wolves — a genuine outlier — this was much more routine. Continue Reading…

Kurt-Vonnegut“I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all the kinds of things you can’t see from the center.” – Kurt Vonnegut, “Player Piano”

In comments to the Star Tribune on Tuesday, Flip Saunders used the word “rebuild” twice, a term he’d avoided to that point. Preferring to call the Wolves’ situation a “retooling” with a “blended” roster mixing young players and veterans, Saunders shifted gears a bit, asking for patience from fans while acknowledging a slight shift in organizational philosophy. That Flip Saunders was President of Basketball Operations and part-owner Flip Saunders doing the talking.

Coach Flip Saunders is a different guy, and in order to beat the Portland Trail Blazers on Wednesday night, dispassionate big picture realism was jettisoned for tactical quirks, the mechanics of victory powered by the fearless installation of an unconventional defensive gameplan. Continue Reading…

Early in Minnesota’s 102-86 loss to the Golden State Warriors, Andrew Bogut was hobbling up and down the floor. It was unclear what was wrong at the time, but it was clear he needed to be taken out. Swiftly, new Golden State head coach Steve Kerr moved to put in backup Festus Ezeli. Bogut would not return to the game.

Golden State came into to the game already a man down, having lost David Lee to a hamstring injury during the Warriors’ season opener. This was not an ideal situation for the Warriors, who have faced the consequence of injury struggles come playoff time the past couple years.

Tonight, however, the Warriors faced off against a Timberwolves team that, when fully healthy, is probably still a worse team than Golden State was short-manned. But Minnesota isn’t healthy right now.

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“This ain’t reality TV!”

That’s one of the big lines from the movie The Departed, delivered by Jack Nicholson in a bizarre role that both fits, doesn’t fit, and falls everywhere in between. It comes during a scene in which (SPOILER ALERT) the tension surrounding a Boston crime boss, an undercover cop, and a bunch of lackeys has built to an uncomfortable level. The undercover cop (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) is on the verge of being found out and murdered by the crime boss (played by Nicholson). DiCaprio’s character just watched a fellow henchman die when Leo was close to getting busted and soon after the death, DiCaprio, Nicholson, and several henchmen watch a news report revealing that the body had been found and the deceased had been identified as an undercover police officer.

The henchman responsible for burying the dead body is wondering how the police found the body so quickly, and Nicholson is furious at everything going on as his empire is starting to unravel. As Nicholson berates him for not doing his job properly, the henchman laughs at the colorful analogy Jack offers up for where the body was dumped. The laughter adds to the vitriol and frustration suffocating Nicholson and he screams:

“Don’t laugh! This ain’t reality TV!” Continue Reading…