Archives For William Bohl

Shakespeare and Love

William Bohl —  July 12, 2014 — 7 Comments
ShakespeareInLove

Photoshop credit: Steve McPherson

“For it so falls out

That what we have we prize not to the worth

Whiles we enjoy it, but being lack’d and lost,

Why, then we rack the value, then we find

The virtue that possession would not show us

Whiles it was ours”

- William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act IV, Scene I

Some relationships end in a fury, a storm of accusations, screaming matches and slamming doors. Other relationships end slowly, gradually, marked by words left unsaid, the quiet, empty spaces where conversation and laughter used to live.

In Shakespearean tragedies, ill-fated romances almost always conclude with the gruesome, if eloquently narrated, death of one or both the characters involved. Thankfully, the tumultuous partnership between Kevin Love and the Timberwolves isn’t so dire; he’s merely leaving for employment in another city, and possibly soon. The conclusion to Minnesota’s Love affair resembles the second type of breakup, the slow kind, quibbles bubbling to the surface every now and again, the atrophy taking its toll until Flip can no longer bear it and Kevin is sent packing.

The Bard almost always killed his star-crossed lovers, but he had a few things to say about more civil splits as well, especially in his comedies. The above quote from Much Ado About Nothing is a flowery rendering of the timeless adage that “you don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone.” And while Love isn’t quite gone yet, and the breakup isn’t complete, many who follow the Timberwolves closely are preemptively employing a common breakup coping mechanism: we’re trying to convince ourselves that we never really loved him at all. Continue Reading…

GR3

With the 40th pick in the NBA Draft, the Minnesota Timberwolves selected Glenn Robinson III, a small forward from the University of Michigan.

Robinson averaged 13.2 points, 4.4 rebounds and 1.2 assists on 49/31/76 shooting splits in 32.7 minutes per game for the Wolverines in 2013-14. He turns 21 in January, stands 6’7 with a 6’10 wingspan, a 42 inch max vertical and weights 211 pounds. He possesses good size and athleticism for an NBA small forward, but must answer questions about shot creation and focus on the defensive end in order to be contributor at the next level.

He got lost in the shuffle, somewhat, playing for such a loaded program during his two seasons in Ann Arbor. All in all, it seems like a pretty good value where the Wolves got him; DraftExpress, for instance, had him pegged somewhere in the late 20s.

Anyway, here’s a fun video of him dunking:

In other news, the Wolves sold the 44th pick to the Brooklyn Nets for a reported $1 million, and they in turn selected Oklahoma State guard Markel Brown. Then, Minnesota sent the 53rd pick to the Houston Rockets for undisclosed cash considerations. Daryl Morey took Italian shooting guard Alessandro Gentile from Milano.

In summary, the Wolves used their second round picks to draft a guy who’ll have a fighting chance to crack the roster (Glenn Robinson III) and profit marginally by selling them off (44, 53) rather than grabbing prospects to stash abroad. Ideally, I would’ve preferred one of the second-rounders to be kept in-house, but don’t feel strongly enough about any of the ones available to get worked up over it.

And with that, the Minnesota Timberwolves 2014 draft has concluded.

Reaction / analysis to come over the next few days.

Minnesota Draft Targets

William Bohl —  June 19, 2014 — 8 Comments

nba-draft

The NBA Draft is exactly one week away, and as of now, Minnesota holds the 13th, 40th, 44th and 53rd overall selections. The Wolves’ standing in the first round could change if they pull the trigger on a Kevin Love trade, which seems more and more likely the closer we get to June 26th. Their second round selections could be used on players the team feels could fight for a roster spot, or they could be packaged to move up, or used on international stash prospects, or they could be sold, as often happens with later picks in the draft. The point is, there’s a ton of uncertainty. A lot could change between now and Draft night, but until the wheeling and dealing begins, all we can do is look long and hard at the prospects that may be available when the Timberwolves’ turn comes around. Continue Reading…

Just Returns

William Bohl —  June 2, 2014 — 13 Comments

2013 NBA Draft Lottery

This weekend, Kevin Love took a well-publicized trip to Boston, feeding the frenzy surrounding the bizarre courtship that’s underway for him, a player under contract for the 2014-15 season. Some may view the jaunt to Beantown as little more than a 25-year-old multimillionaire kicking back in one of America’s finest cities; the more cynical among us look at it as a calculated maneuver to inform the Wolves front office (and, perhaps, the fan base) that he’s already begun to move on. Continue Reading…

Kevin Martin2

We’re kicking off our offseason coverage here at A Wolf Among Wolves with a comprehensive roster review of the team from this past season, looking at how each player’s 2012-13 went and what we see for them going forward. One player a day for the next couple weeks, starting with the bench and rolling up to the starters.

Kevin Martin came to the Timberwolves via a July 11th sign-and-trade deal, inking a 4 year, $27.75 million contract, and immediately became the best shooting guard in Minnesota history. For a team that ranked dead last in the NBA in perimeter shooting in 2013-14 and in the bottom half of the league in free throw percentage, K-Mart was a sight for sore eyes. Employing unconventional (though effective) shot mechanics, the tenth-year man from Western Carolina brought a 38.5% career mark from outside the arc to Minneapolis. Between Martin, a healthy Kevin Love and a healthy Chase Budinger, the Timberwolves had every reason to hope their offensive woes would be solved, at least partially, by the sheer force of success from three-point land. Observers also wondered if his ability to get to the foul line (where he converts 86.9% of the time, 24th-best in NBA history) would return after a year of being utilized primarily as a spot-up shooter in Oklahoma City.

The results were somewhat mixed. Statistically, Martin turned in a season on par with his per-36 minute career averages. He scored 21.5 points, grabbed 3.4 rebounds and dished out 2.0 assists on 43/39/89 shooting splits. Over his decade in the league, those numbers are 20.9 points, 3.8 rebounds and 2.3 assists on 44/39/87 splits. On the surface, he seemed like the same guy he’s always been, but once you look a little closer, you begin to see that wasn’t exactly the case.

Continue Reading…

12wolf0119.jpg

We’re kicking off our offseason coverage here at A Wolf Among Wolves with a comprehensive roster review of the team from this past season, looking at how each player’s 2012-13 went and what we see for them going forward. One player a day for the next couple weeks, starting with the bench and rolling up to the starters.

“When J.J. Barea gets that steely glint in his eye, the possession is only ending one of two ways, and neither are not shooting. You saw that glint most often this past season somewhere around the mid-third quarter, at the point where the Wolves had let the lead slip enough that it was in jeopardy, or else had fought back enough that it was within striking distance. As Barea received the ball on the inbounds pass, someone on our row of the media section would likely mutter, “It’s going up.” Or maybe as Barea brought the ball across the half-court and held one hand up in a fist, someone would joke, “That’s the number of passes that are going to happen on this play.””

Recognize that? It was Steve McPherson’s roster review of J.J. Barea in May of 2013. Tempted as I was to make the backup point guard’s review nothing but the above quote, plus several pictures of him arguing with officials and links to unflattering videos such as this one, I ultimately decided any evaluation of Barea’s season ought to be more nuanced than that. Continue Reading…

In the wee hours of Sunday morning, Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports dropped one of his patented “bombs“, which is usually fun, because he (often unexpectedly) reports a big piece of league news. But in this instance, for Timberwolves fans, the Woj-bomb was more of a vague reference to a landmine somewhere along Flip Saunders’ path, which wasn’t much fun to wake up to. Continue Reading…

alexey-shved-goes-trick-or-treating-1024x576

It was all downhill from here.

We’re kicking off our offseason coverage here at A Wolf Among Wolves with a comprehensive roster review of the team from this past season, looking at how each player’s 2013-14 went and what we see for them going forward. One player a day for the next couple weeks, starting with the bench and rolling up to the starters.

In one of the season’s final games, a loss at home to the Chicago Bulls, FSN North color analyst Jim Petersen issued a plea for Timberwolves fans to keep hope alive for Alexey Shved. It was a long, frustrating season for the second-year man from Belgorod, Russia, and Petersen, being the positive force that he is, attempted to highlight his strengths – size and athleticism. “Don’t give up on him,” said Jim Pete. “He can still find a way to put it together.”

When Shved arrived, I was excited at the prospect of a combo guard with passing acumen, leaping ability and a solid jump shot – which is the bill of goods we were sold in July of 2012. The first two months of his career were solid enough to warrant cautious optimism… but then everything fell apart. He was in the rotation through the middle of January, but never produced nearly enough to stay there, and his minutes waned as the season drew to a closeHis slight build puts him at a disadvantage on the defensive end to begin with, and the rigors of the long NBA season, plus the nightly chore of running through and around large, screening bigs, wore him out. Offensively, he did a few good things in his rookie season, but nothing went right in 2013-14. Running the pick and roll at the NBA level is a riddle he’s never solved; his inconsistent shot mechanics leave him prone to long stretches of futility.

To put it bluntly, and to politely disobey the inestimable Jim Petersen: I’m giving up on Alexey Shved. Continue Reading…

PRICE

Luckily, someone thought to snap a photo during one of A.J. Price’s infrequent and brief appearances on the floor.

We’re kicking off our offseason coverage here at A Wolf Among Wolves with a comprehensive roster review of the team from this past season, looking at how each player’s 2013-14 went and what we see for them going forward. One player a day for the next couple weeks, starting with the bench and rolling up to the starters.

What a strange, uneven, and relatively anonymous season it was for Anthony Jordan Price, better known as A.J., backup point guard to the backup point guard for the Minnesota Timberwolves. He was signed late in the free agency period last offseason (September 27th, just four days prior to training camp) and released before the end of the regular season (on April 3rd); in between, he never appeared in more than five consecutive games, tallied 99 total minutes on the floor, underwent an emergency appendectomy, and missed every free throw he attempted (yep – both of them). Continue Reading…

Adelman Photo

Monday morning, Rick Adelman took the stage outside the Wolves’ training facility and announced what many have long suspected: the 67-year-old is officially retiring from coaching in the NBA. He will remain with the organization as an advisor, but his days dealing with the worry of game-planning, roster construction, and the hassles of trekking across North America are over.

“It’s a real grind. You get some time off in the summer, but it’s pretty much on your mind all the time,” Adelman said. “There’s some sadness, but there’s also a relief. I’m ready and my wife’s ready to move on to another phase. We’re looking forward to that.” Continue Reading…