Archives For Ricky Rubio

LoveContest

We’ve been here before, hoping for competitive losses.

I should clarify. I’ve certainly been here before. I can’t assume you guys are necessarily there with me and based on the frustration flowing through my Twitter feed and some of the local media on Sunday, I might be mostly alone on this one for now. That’s probably the case because this is the latest in a season the Wolves have been competitive in about a decade. It’s also probably because the expectations heading into this season were competing for the playoffs. With roughly three weeks left, it would take two monumental collapses and the Wolves not collapsing to make that a reality.

Because of the draft pick implications heading into the game against the Phoenix Suns, my hopes for the game were for it to be extremely competitive and for the Wolves to protect their draft pick lives. Losing to the Suns was going to all but guarantee they keep the pick, assuming the Suns don’t come through on the 1.8% chance of landing a top 3 pick on the night of the lottery (that’s also assuming they don’t make the playoffs). The Suns making the playoffs altogether would actually be ideal because the Wolves would almost certainly keep the pick.

What I wanted out of Sunday’s game happened.  Continue Reading…

RickyBuckets2

I’m not going to be unrealistic here. That was a bit flukey.

Ricky Rubio became the new Ricky Buckets, if only for a night, and it was largely due to a pretty mediocre at best Dallas Mavericks’ defense. I don’t know why Jose Calderon was pressuring Rubio when he had the ball 30 feet from the basket. I don’t know why Calderon lets guys turn the corner on him with such little resistance. I don’t know why Samuel Dalembert wears cement shoes. I don’t know why Monta Ellis plays horrendous defense and then pretends it’s the refs’ fault. Whatever the answers to those issues are, Rubio did arguably the best job attacking a defense I’ve ever seen.

And while I’m going to be realistic about a game like this and note its flukey nature like I did above, it’s not going to stop be from enjoying the hell out of this performance. 22 points, 15 assists, 10 rebounds, and four steals with 8/12 shooting from the field and 7/9 in the restricted area.  Continue Reading…

LoveRecord

The Minnesota Timberwolves need to hit more shots.

The end.

Okay, that’s not totally the end. That would be an extremely short post of basketball analysis, but at this point in the season I am of the belief that this is the crux of the Wolves’ issue with the 2013-14 season. It’s hard to judge the disappointment of everything going on because the expectations and preseason guessing are what creates the disappointment. If we all went into this season with the expectation the Wolves would miss the playoffs and had no real chance at getting some postseason experience, would we be disappointed at all?  Continue Reading…

I know the Raptors' mascot wasn't there last night, but c'mon, he's awesome.

I know the Raptors’ mascot wasn’t there last night, but c’mon, he’s awesome.

Last night, the first season of HBO’s loathed and lauded True Detective came to an end but DON’T WORRY. There are no spoilers here because like many, many people I couldn’t watch it because HBO GO sputtered and died under the weight of everyone logging into their parents’ accounts to watch the finale.

But before that, the Minnesota Timberwolves lost a basketball match to the Toronto Raptors, dropping the Wolves to 31-31 and five games back from Memphis (in the eighth and final playoff spot) and Phoenix (in the ninth). The Wolves’ playoff odds according to the ghost of John Hollinger at ESPN now stand at 11.5%. The capsule summary of the game looks a lot like ones we’ve seen before: In spite of 26 points, 11 rebounds and 9 assists from Kevin Love (and a new single season record for made 3-pointers by a Timberwolf (144)) and 17 and 11 from Nikola Pekovic, in spite of a strong level of effort all around, the Wolves couldn’t get enough production, particularly up close. Continue Reading…

 

Love and Cousins

“You knew the Kings weren’t going to go down without a fight…” – Dave Benz

“I thought they might.” – Jim Petersen

The above quotes, offered at the 8:00 mark of the 4th quarter by FSN North’s excellent play-by-play and color analysts, respectively, captured the mood perfectly for the Timberwolves. Minnesota had pushed their lead to 14 after 3 quarters, using a dominant 31-to-14 3rd period to take control after trailing by 3 at the half. The undersized reserve lineup of Barea – Budinger – Muhammad – Mbah a Moute – Cunningham failed to tread water at the beginning of the final frame, and by the time the Wolves’ reinforcements (Love, Martin and Brewer) checked in with 8:34 remaining, the lead was just 7 points.

You knew the Wolves weren’t going to blow another game to the lowly Kings, especially given their current desperate state, right? That the bench wouldn’t be to blame, especially since they’ve been better of late? You knew beforehand that Quincy Acy and Reggie Evans weren’t the same person, correct? That the Timberwolves weren’t going to fail to keep Rudy Gay in check for the second time in a month and a half? And you knew, at some point, the Wolves record in close games would progress to the mean, that they couldn’t just keep losing tight contests in perpetuity?

The answer to all these questions: “I thought they might.” Continue Reading…

Here’s a problem: You watch a game of basketball and you know something about basketball. You might know a little, or you might think you know a lot, or you might even be aware that the rather large amount you know pales in comparison to what everyone who’s directly involved in the game knows. And not in some “You can’t know unless you’ve played” way, but in the way that it’s nearly impossible for you to comprehend the volumetric gap in knowledge between whatever you know about the game — as vast as that amount might feel — and what, say, Rick Adelman knows after coaching 2,794 games. Two thousand seven hundred and ninety-four. Continue Reading…

Love and Rubio

Even the most optimistic Timberwolves fan probably didn’t expect the hometown squad to dominate one of the top teams in the NBA as thoroughly as Minnesota dominated Indiana on Wednesday night. True, the Pacers were on the second night of a back-to-back, and the Wolves were fresh after having a full week off thanks to the All-Star break. But this is Indiana we’re talking about, owners of a 41-12 record (at the beginning of the night), rolling along with the game’s next superstar (Paul George) and sporting the league’s best defensive rating. How did Minnesota, short two of their three best offensive options (Nikola Pekovic and Kevin Martin), manage to handle Indiana so convincingly? Continue Reading…

Passing-drills.-Screencap-via-ROOT-Sports

Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard said, “Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.” So it goes with basketball as well. The search this season for some kind of overarching sense to the Minnesota Timberwolves has so far been fruitless. They have destroyed teams, have eaten them whole, bones and all. Ten times so far this season they have led the other team by 30 or more points (and led the Jazz by 26 in last night’s game). The next closest team to that is San Antonio, who have done it six times, or just over half as many times.

And then, of course, there’s the flipside of that, where they are (say it with me) 0-11 in games decided by four points or less. Trying to reconcile these two things leads to a lot of furious narrative building: they don’t beat the teams they’re supposed to beat; they only beat bad teams; they need to execute down the stretch; they’re fundamentally flawed; it’s all on Ricky Rubio’s shooting; it’s all on Kevin Love’s defense; it’s all on Rick Adelman’s age; it’s all on the bench. Continue Reading…

Toronto Tourism ad: ‘White Vegas’ from The Basketball Jones on Vimeo.

I came away with three thoughts about the Wolves’ most recent loss, which was probably the one I’ve been the most accepting of (because I expected it) and the one that was simultaneously the most frustrating even though I had accepted their fate long before tip-off.

The first thought was about that acceptance of the loss, knowing it was coming while not trying to approach that submissive thought from a pessimistic origin. The Wolves simply don’t win in Toronto. After last night’s “effort”, they’ve dropped to 3-16 there all-time and they haven’t won there since 2004 when the Wolves last fielded a team that seemed to give a damn whilst being able to do something about it. This is the exact kind of “marriage to the old guard” I’ve been hoping people would divorce themselves of with a new regime and a very talented roster. And yet, here I am latching on to negativity of the past, simply because the nightlife of Toronto seems to call this organization.

This game seemed to go the exact same way most of these affairs in T Dot go. Seemingly poor execution met with malaise and a dash of “is this game over yet?” After the first quarter, I was hoping the bench would get extended minutes. After the bench got extended minutes, I was hoping the starters would have a fire lit under them. After that, I was hoping the bench would play a lot of minutes in the second half. And by the end, I was waiting for the Raptors to tell us they had to get up early and rush out the door for a waiting taxi. There was also a sick part of me that wanted the game to end in a loss of four points or less, but that’s just me losing my mind at the moment.  Continue Reading…

CharlieBrown

There’s an old maxim that says when infidelity becomes an issue in a relationship, it’s not actually the problem — it’s just a symptom of a more fundamental flaw. Don’t worry: The Timberwolves aren’t cheating, although at this point I think a good chunk of the fanbase would be all right with them giving that a shot. But what that adage gets at is how difficult it can be to tell what needs fixing when things aren’t right. Fix the symptom and it goes away, but the underlying problem remains. But how do you tell which is which?

Are the Wolves’ problems — and boy, do they have problems — mechanical? Does it really just come down to execution in close games? If they move the ball more crisply and often, if they take good shots, will they win these games? And not just win any given game, but create a deep-seated sense that they can control any given game? Anyone can see that in a game like last night’s loss to the Kings (which will get shuttled into that category of losses by four points or less, bringing their record in such games to 0-11) the team was completely flat and listless for nearly the entire game. So is it the energy? If they bring the energy, will it fix the execution? Or will good execution get their energy up? Continue Reading…